Friday, September 27, 2013

Poetry Friday: A review of Gone Fishing: A Novel in Verse

I have only been fishing a few times. My husband and I went fishing in the Chesapeake Bay and brought home pounds of bluefish and striped bass and sea trout. The expeditions were a lot of fun, often full of excitement and quite exhausting. In today's poetry title you will meet two children and their dad who go fishing on a lake and who have an day that they will probably never forget.

Tamera Will Wissinger
Illustrated by Matthew Cordell
Poetry
For ages 7 to 10
Houghton Mifflin, 2013, 978-0-547-82011-8
Sam is excited because he is going to go fishing with his dad tomorrow. Together they go out at night to collect night crawlers. They have to “Tiptoe near and grab them quick” if they don’t want to have to play tug-o-war with the wriggling creatures.
   Sam gets out his tackle box, and then he finds out that what should be sacrosanct has been invaded by Lucy, his little sister. She has put her princess doll in his precious tackle box and a bunch of his stuff is missing. Where is his map and his compass?
   Lucy explains that she just wanted to play with his box and that his possessions are safe. To say that Sam is annoyed is an understatement and he comes up with a spell to curse his sister for meddling with his tackle box. At least he won’t have to deal with her tomorrow when he and Dad go fishing.
   Alas for Sam. The next morning his one-on-one time with his father is invaded by Lucy. Dad agrees that Lucy can come along on the fishing trip and there is nothing Sam can do about it. After waiting for Lucy for what feels like an age, a thrilled Lucy, Dad and a very unhappy Sam get into the car and head for the lake.
   Sam can hope that he will catch lots of fish and that Lucy won’t catch a thing, but this is not what happens. It doesn’t seem at all fair when Lucy, in spite of the noise she makes and the silly song she sings, catches a fish on her second cast. Surely this trip cannot get any worse?
  Using a variety of poetry forms, the author tells the story of a fishing trip that does not quite work out as planned. Readers will find easy to feel sorry for Sam, though the mishaps he has are rather funny. The story is told using an acrostic poem, a list poem, a concrete poem, a narrative poem, and many other kinds of poetry forms.
   At the back of the book the author provides her readers with more information about the poetry forms that were used in the book.


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